Thirty Cats And Kittens Living In Squalor Rescued By 101 Degree RV

Pima Animal Care Center (PACC) rescue group and animal control officials came only in time to save more than 30 cats and kittens out of squalor states in an RV with temperatures over 100 levels.

PACC stated that they received multiple calls from concerned citizens about the potential cat hoarder. The rescue team arrived in the RV, which was surrounded by garbage and discovered 30 kittens and cats indoors covered in urine and feces. In addition to the uninhabitable states, the temperature within the RV was 101 degrees.

All the cats were in warm distress, and rescuers state, « were both open-mouth breathing and panting. » They were gently put in crates and caused by PACC to be analyzed and treated.
One kitty was discovered dead at a crate, and the remaining cats possess upper respiratory troubles. « We will be working to conserve these cats’ lives during the next few days, » stated Kristen Hassen, the Manager of Animal Services. « They are in serious illness, and they are heading directly into our emergency medical practice for therapy. »


After analyzing the cats, the team found that almost all of them have ringworm. They are taking all the necessary steps to make sure that it does not propagate to employees’ additional shelter pets. They are now searching for foster homes or adopters to choose in a few ringworm kittens to help them recover quicker.

PACC wrote, « These kittens experience a protracted treatment from the shelter. They generally cure much quicker in a house environment where they get extra attention. Ringworm kitties wind up being among the finest around! » While the team is busy caring for all of the novices, they remind folks that there are more than 200 pets in their refuge prepared for forever homes.
That does not count the 575 in foster homes, so if you are seeking to embrace, please check their site pima.gov/embrace. Regrettably, as a result of the pandemic, the protector sees an increase in stray intakes and 25-45 fresh ones every day.


« We need people to understand we are here to assist, and it does not need to get this awful, » Hassen said.